360 West February 2017 : Page 16

Love Stories Three Weddings and a Veil For one Fort Worth family, a multigenerational devotion to tradition runs deep, especially when it comes to affairs of the heart. That’s why three generations of women have said their vows, most recently this past June, wearing a long mantilla-style veil purchased by a family matriarch in Italy. For members of the Cole, Kobs and Turney families, the fall of lace is a reminder of strong familial ties and an enduring symbol of love. — Meda Kessler f The Granddaughter ort Worth native Allie Kobs did not adopted the tradition. For her destination wedding in Carmel-by-the-Sea, California, she an Ines Di Santo gown that complemented it packed the veil for the seaside event, along with perfectly. She chose Carmel mainly because of there with family. On a beautiful late summer day this past June, the sea breeze gently lifted up the veil — Allie wore it fastened to her have a specifi c wedding dress in mind immediately after her engagement to Walker Turney in July 2015, but she did like. Made in Italy, it was as key to her know exactly what her veil would look it was worn by Allie’s mother and numerous Decades after Cole was wed wearing the veil, purchased the Spanish-style veil in Rome. for grandmother, Nina Maria Cole, who wedding-day ensemble as it had been happy memories of summers spent vacationing updo — as she held onto her father’s arm and walked across the 14 th hole on the Monterey Peninsula Country Club Dunes Course. cousins and other female relatives. Allie happily Photos courtesy of Scott Campbell Photography 16 February 2017 360westmagazine.com

Love Stories

Three Weddings and a Veil


For one Fort Worth family, a multigenerational devotion to tradition runs deep, especially when it comes to affairs of the heart. That’s why three generations of women have said their vows, most recently this past June, wearing a long mantillastyle veil purchased by a family matriarch in Italy. For members of the Cole, Kobs and Turney families, the fall of lace is a reminder of strong familial ties and an enduring symbol of love. — Meda Kessler



Photos courtesy of Scott Campbell Photography

The Granddaughter

Fort Worth native Allie Kobs did not have a specific wedding dress in mind immediately after her engagement to Walker Turney in July 2015, but she did know exactly what her veil would look like. Made in Italy, it was as key to her wedding-day ensemble as it had been for grandmother, Nina Maria Cole, who purchased the Spanish-style veil in Rome. Decades after Cole was wed wearing the veil, it was worn by Allie’s mother and numerous cousins and other female relatives. Allie happily adopted the tradition. For her destination wedding in Carmel-by-the-Sea, California, she packed the veil for the seaside event, along with an Ines Di Santo gown that complemented it perfectly. She chose Carmel mainly because of happy memories of summers spent vacationing there with family. On a beautiful late summer day this past June, the sea breeze gently lifted up the veil — Allie wore it fastened to her updo — as she held onto her father’s arm and walked across the 14th hole on the Monterey Peninsula Country Club Dunes Course.



The Mother

Allie Kobs’ mother, Carroll, wore the mantilla-style veil when she married Jeff Kobs in July 1986. It framed her shoulder-length dark hair and complemented the lace overlay of her long-sleeved gown. “It’s been worn many times since then,” says Carroll, “and I believe it’s only been repaired once — by a lace specialist at The Witte Museum in San Antonio. The veil has been to many places, including weddings inside the Washington National Cathedral in Washington, D.C.” Carroll and Jeff — who have been married for 30 years — proudly watched daughter Allie take her vows this past summer. They were married at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church in Fort Worth, as was Carroll’s mother. “I wanted to carry on the tradition of wearing Mom’s veil,” Carroll says.



Photo courtesy of the Kobs family



The Grandmother

Nina Maria Korth Cole was unable to attend the wedding of granddaughter Allie but was honored at the veil tribute table, where framed photos of her and others wearing the veil were assembled. Sadly, she passed away a few months later, but her love and legacy live on in the veil, which now awaits the next wedding. The tradition began when a young Nina Maria Korth purchased the veil while vacationing in Rome. She wasn’t yet engaged but already was preparing for the day she would marry Gary Cole, the love of her life. The couple, both Fort Worth natives, first met when Nina attended Gary’s fifth birthday party. Nina and Gary married in 1955 at St. Andrew’s. Nina wore the long face-framing veil with a sleeveless ballgown-style dress with a portrait collar, a strand of small pearls and opera-length gloves. She and Gary were married for 61 years.

Newly married Allie smiles when she talks about her grandparents and parents and their long marriages. “It’s a good sign for Walker and me.”



Photo courtesy of the Cole family

Read the full article at http://digital.360westmagazine.com/article/Love+Stories/2693786/378679/article.html.

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