360 West 360 West November 2016 : Page 122

Spotlight S panel discussions and creenings, parties — the only way to the 10 th annual Lone Star experience everything that Film Festival has to offer is with an all-access badge. In addition to providing unlimited access to screenings during the four-day festival, the badge is discussions like the one required for entry to panel that brings Jane Seymour, Malcolm McDowell and chat about their careers. New this year for the Sundance Square event Joanna Kerns together to Four Day Weekend has a new projector for this year’s festival — and a large seating capacity that makes it the first choice for films that draw the biggest crowds. Photo by Manny Pandya is a Filmmakers Lounge From documentaries to comedies to dramas to horror, the Lone Star Film Festival celebrates its 10 th anniversary with a packed schedule. Here’s our must-see list. hosted by the Fort Worth badge holders can put Film Commission, where their feet up, listen to some music and sip on a drink between screenings. Show Times Power of the River: Expedition to the Heart of Water in Bhutan Bhutan boasts of having the world’s strongest commitment to protecting nature, but even in that country the pressure is mounting to dam all the rivers to create more hydropower. International documentary Power of the River follows a Buddhist guide called “Good Karma” — who hopes to keep just one river undammed — as he leads an expedition through pockets of raging whitewater and untouched beauty. Written and directed by Greg I. Hamilton, the film offers stunning vistas of the river and the surrounding Himalayas. Joining Hamilton and Karma Tshering takes his son to school in director of Power of the River , filmed in Bhutan. photography Photo by Tshering “Paco” Penjore Matthew Whalen for the screening is Dasho Paljor J. Dorji of Bhutan’s National Environment Commission, who is called Dasho “Benji” in the film. Screening 11 a.m. Nov. 11 at Four Day Weekend. film enthusiast who can’t clear the entire weekend but wants to see that And for the more casual quirky new comedy or a moving documentary? Individual tickets to screenings are $10 at the door, and many include a Q&A with the talent behind the film, often a the scenes. Here’s a Screenwriter Blaise Miller, center, also plays a lead role in the feature film Homestate . Image courtesy of Casita Films LLC fascinating peek behind roundup of screenings Homestate Family life — husband Harvey is struggling with his new business and wife Crystal is taking care of their 10-year-old daughter — is interrupted when Crystal’s troubled brother, Josh, shows up needing a place to stay. From his new digs in the backyard camper, Josh seems to be a natural at being there for his sister and niece, especially compared to Harvey. The LSFF’s opening-night feature is truly homegrown; Fort Worth-raised David Hickey directs and stars as Harvey. The film was shot in Hickey’s Austin home with his real-life wife and daughter doing double duty on-screen. Hickey and screenwriter Blaise Miller, who portrays Josh, will be at the Q&A following the film. Screening 7:30 p.m. Nov. 10 at Four Day Weekend. we’re looking forward to at this year’s Lone Star Film Festival. — Laura Samuel Meyn 122 November 2016 360westmagazine.com

Spotlight



Four Day Weekend has a new projector for this year’s festival — and a large seating capacity that makes it the first choice for films that draw the biggest crowds.

Photo by Manny Pandya

Sceenings, panel discussion parties — the only way to experience everything that the 10th annual Lone Star Film Festival has to offer is with an all-access badge. In addition to providing unlimited access to screenings during the fourday festival, the badge is required for entry to panel discussions like the one that brings Jane Seymour, Malcolm McDowell and Joanna Kerns together to chat about their careers. New this year for the Sundance Square event is a Filmmakers Lounge hosted by the Fort Worth Film Commission, where badge holders can put their feet up, listen to some music and sip on a drink between screenings.

And for the more casual film enthusiast who can’t clear the entire weekend but wants to see that quirky new comedy or a moving documentary?
Individual tickets to screenings are $10 at the door, and many include a Q&A with the talent behind the film, often a fascinating peek behind the scenes. Here’s a roundup of screenings we’re looking forward to at this year’s Lone Star Film Festival.

— Laura Samuel Meyn

From documentaries to comedies to dramas to horror, the Lone Star Film Festival celebrates its 10th anniversary with a packed schedule. Here’s our must-see list.



Show Times


Screenwriter Blaise Miller, center, also plays a lead role in the feature film Homestate.

Image courtesy of Casita Films LLC

Homestate

Family life — husband Harvey is struggling with his new business and wife Crystal is taking care of their 10-year-old daughter — is interrupted when Crystal’s troubled brother, Josh, shows up needing a place to stay. From his new digs in the backyard camper, Josh seems to be a natural at being there for his sister and niece, especially compared to Harvey. The LSFF’s opening-night feature is truly homegrown; Fort Worth-raised David Hickey directs and stars as Harvey. The film was shot in Hickey’s Austin home with his real-life wife and daughter doing double duty on-screen. Hickey and screenwriter Blaise Miller, who portrays Josh, will be at the Q&A following the film. Screening 7:30 p.m. Nov. 10 at Four Day Weekend.



Karma Tshering takes his son to school in Power of the River, filmed in Bhutan.

Photo by Tshering “Paco” Penjore

Power of the River: Expedition to the Heart of Water in Bhutan

Bhutan boasts of having the world’s strongest commitment to protecting nature, but even in that country the pressure is mounting to dam all the rivers to create more hydropower. International documentary Power of the River follows a Buddhist guide called “Good Karma” — who hopes to keep just one river undammed — as he leads an expedition through pockets of raging whitewater and untouched beauty. Written and directed by Greg I. Hamilton, the film offers stunning vistas of the river and the surrounding Himalayas. Joining Hamilton and director of photography Matthew Whalen for the screening is Dasho Paljor J. Dorji of Bhutan’s National Environment Commission, who is called Dasho “Benji” in the film. Screening 11 a.m. Nov. 11 at Four Day Weekend.



Dev Patel is Saroo Brierley, a man searching for his family, in Lion.

Image courtesy of Toronto International Film Festival

Lion

A 5-year-old boy gets separated from his brother and ends up lost in Calcutta; after he is taken into an orphanage, an Australian couple adopts him. Twenty-five years later, using Google Earth, he searches for his family of origin. Lion has been generating buzz since its world premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September; the fact that Garth Davis’ feature is based on a true story makes it all the more moving. It boasts the same production team as The King’s Speech and a heavy-hitting cast — Dev Patel, Rooney Mara, Nicole Kidman — so don’t be surprised if Lion garners an Academy Award nomination or two in January. Screening 6:30 p.m. Nov. 12 at Four Day Weekend.




Cheyenne Jackson, left, and Collin Smith in William J. Stribling’s Bear with Us.

Image courtesy of director of photography Alex Gallitano

Bear With Us

Imagine a romantic getaway to a charming cabin in the woods — with a marriage proposal planned, no less. Then consider that the relationship turns out to be rather one-sided, two annoying friends tag along, the cabin is less quaint than it is spooky, and a hungry bear shows up. If it all sounds silly, bear with us: LSFF director Chad Mathews promises that this modern farce from William J. Stribling is a really good ride. This marriageproposal- gone-wrong tale has been making the film festival circuit, picking up awards and getting laughs along the way. Stick around after the film, for a Q&A with screenwriter Russ Nickel. Screening 8:15 p.m. Nov. 11 at Four Day Weekend.


Aria Appleton

Eleven-year-old Aria Appleton wants to be a star — even at the expense of her best friend. But when her mom travels, Appleton is forced to stay with her babysitter’s eccentric but kind family, and her cutthroat ambition begins to erode. Expect musical numbers and some animation, too, as Appleton retreats into her imagination to work through her feelings. The family comedy was shot in North Texas with a mostly Fort Worth-based cast and crew, led by director and producer Nathan D. Myers, who wrote six songs for the project. Round up your schoolage squad and treat them to an independent film — and watch for familiar faces and places. Screening 11 a.m. Nov. 12 at Four Day Weekend.



Fort Worth actors Sara Grace Prejean and Stephen Newton star in Aria Appleton.

Image courtesy of Grafted Studios

Short Block: Texas Filmmakers

Among the 15 blocks of short films, one is devoted to films that are from or about the Lone Star State. On the program is This Is Home, a 22-minute documentary about Fort Worth musician Leon Bridges, who in 2015 went from washing dishes and playing open mike nights to landing a record deal with Columbia. It’s filled with soulful music, retro styles and interviews with Bridges’ bandmates, mother and others. Bridges is traveling during the film festival, but director Danny Clinch is on hand for the Q&A. Screening 1:30 p.m. Nov. 11 at Four Day Weekend.

As Far As the Eye Can See

Jack Ridge, a former piano prodigy, lives in seclusion on his family’s neglected North Texas farm. Nursing his wounds — his wife has left him and he has injured his hand — Ridge faces pressure to perform in an annual piano competition and to sell his land. Already living in the past at 40, he’s challenged to find his way forward. The drama makes its Texas premiere at the LSFF and brings producer Stephen Ellis, a Fort Worth native, home to attend the screening. Director David Franklin offers a Q&A afterward. Screening 6 p.m. Nov. 11 at Four Day Weekend.


Camino

Screening its world premiere is Justin Herring’s dark comedy Camino, which follows two El Camino-driving young men from Lufkin. The guys drown their sorrows by stealing beer-packed coolers and guzzling the contents with gusto. Things go horribly wrong when they take the wrong cooler; instead of cold beer, it holds two human kidneys on ice. With criminals tailing them, the guys find themselves in deep trouble. Herring and screenwriter John Patrick Hughes will hold a Q&A after the show. Screening 4 p.m. Nov. 12 at Four Day Weekend.



THE DETAILS

Lone Star Film Festival The festival is in Sundance Square Nov. 10-13; screenings are at Four Day Weekend (312 Houston St.), which has been upgraded with a new projector for the festival, and AMC Palace 9 (220 E. 3rd St.). Panel discussions and the Filmmakers Lounge are at The Worthington Renaissance Fort Worth Hotel (200 Main St.). Sunday’s schedule features encore screenings of the festival’s award-winning films. Single tickets, $10; all access badge, $200. Lonestarfilmfestival.com.

Lone Star Film Festival Ball Jane Seymour is presented with the Achievement in Acting Award, and Clint Black accepts the Stephen Bruton Award at the annual fundraiser. Tickets, $600. New this year is an after-party following the ball, with drinks, dessert and live music. Tickets, $50. The Worthington Renaissance Fort Worth Hotel, 200 Main St., Fort Worth; lonestarfilmfestival.com.

Read the full article at http://digital.360westmagazine.com/article/Spotlight/2620478/350739/article.html.

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