360 West August 2015 : Page 70

The Cool Issue >> Classics Iced Tea: Summer’s Simple Pleasure There’s something undeniably Texan about drinking iced tea. Leave the state, and `V\»SSÄUK[OH[V[OLYZYLHSS`KVU»[&#xKLYZ;[HUK+VU»[L_WLJ[[VÄUKP[VUTLU\ZPU Europe or offered at beach resorts in Mexico. Closer to home, anywhere from Canada to Colorado and coast to coast, our year-round requests for iced tea mark us as being from the Lone Star State. And we’re okay with that. We’re not talking about sweet tea, although plenty of us drink our tea sweetened. But the beverage known by the moniker “sweet tea” is for us too sweet to be thirst quenching. A product of the Deep South, it even has a drawl to its name. What we want is classic Texas iced tea, made fresh daily and poured with a clatter of ice cubes and a splash in barbecue joints, diners HUKSVJHSS`V^ULKJHMLZ9LÄSSZHYLMYLLHUKWSLU[PM\S;OLPJLK[LH^L»YL[OPYZ[`MVYPZ not aromatic with fruit or herbaceous — it stands on simplicity: black tea and water. Photo by Aaron Dougherty TEXAS TEA Just how it should be made is open to debate, with some people swearing sun tea is never bitter and others proclaiming that the steeping water must be poured just short of boiling. What we know for certain is that the tea has to be black, and it has to be bagged. Come summer, we want the tea our mother made every night of the week. (S^H`ZP[^HZJSLHY·UL]LYJSV\K`·ZTVV[OHUKIYPNO[S`ÅH]VYLK>LKYHURP[H[ lunch with egg salad sandwiches and at night with fried chicken. And Mama poured [OLYLÄSSZ0[MLLSZSPRLJVTPUNOVTLL]LY`[PTL^LKYPURHNSHZZ — Babs Rodriguez Serves 6 Bring 6 cups of water just to a boil and pour over 7 bags of black pekoe tea in a heatproof container. Let steep for 5 minutes, then squeeze and remove tea bags. Set aside until tea is room temperature — chilling tea too quickly makes it cloudy. Transfer to a pitcher and serve by pouring over a glassful of ice. Lemon and sugar are optional.

Classics

Iced Tea: Summer's Simple Pleasure

There's something undeniably Texan about drinking iced tea. Leave the state, and you'll find that others really don't understand. Don't expect to find it on menus in Europe or offered at beach resorts in Mexico. Closer to home, anywhere from Canada to Colorado and coast to coast, our year-round requests for iced tea mark us as being from the Lone Star State. And we're okay with that. We're not talking about sweet tea, although plenty of us drink our tea sweetened. But the beverage known by the moniker "sweet tea" is for us too sweet to be thirst quenching. A product of the Deep South, it even has a drawl to its name. What we want is classic Texas iced tea, made fresh daily and poured with a clatter of ice cubes and a splash in barbecue joints, diners and locally owned cafes. Refills are free and plentiful. The iced tea we're thirsty for is not aromatic with fruit or herbaceous — it stands on simplicity: black tea and water. Just how it should be made is open to debate, with some people swearing sun tea is never bitter and others proclaiming that the steeping water must be poured just short of boiling. What we know for certain is that the tea has to be black, and it has to be bagged. Come summer, we want the tea our mother made every night of the week. Always it was clear — never cloudy — smooth and brightly flavored. We drank it at lunch with egg salad sandwiches and at night with fried chicken. And Mama poured the refills. It feels like coming home every time we drink a glass. — Babs Rodriguez

TEXAS TEA

Serves 6 Bring 6 cups of water just to a boil and pour over 7 bags of black pekoe tea in a heatproof container.

Let steep for 5 minutes, then squeeze and remove tea bags.

Set aside until tea is room temperature — chilling tea too quickly makes it cloudy.

Transfer to a pitcher and serve by pouring over a glassful of ice.

Lemon and sugar are optional.

Read the full article at http://digital.360westmagazine.com/article/Classics/2230864/267273/article.html.

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